Great eclipse takes Warsaw High by storm

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Lacey Andrews

Freshman Joe Montez watched the moon pass in front of the sun as it approaches 90 percent totality during the solar eclipse on August 21st. Montez was among the students to go out onto the football to watch the eclipse. To be able to watch it on the field students needed to have provided yourself with a pair of solar eclipse glasses to protect your eyes from the sun's rays.

For the last several months, the US has been getting ready for the first Great Eclipse. On August 21, a line of totality stretched out across Missouri to cover Warsaw in 90 percent darkness. Students gathered outside wearing specially made sunglasses for rare events like this. For most students this was a very rare and special occasion that they wanted to make memorable. Some even skipped the school day to go out with family and friends.

  Junior Trinity Collins was one of the students to spend the day outside of school looking forward to the exciting occasion. Collins spent her day in Sedalia on State Fairgrounds among a crowd of very excited college students and families ready to watch the eclipse.

  “I went to Sedalia because I knew I would not get to see full totality at school. I was happy, it was pretty groovy,” Collins said.

  At the school, for the students to view the eclipse outside, the students needed to have a permission slip signed by their legal guardian and their eclipse glasses in hand. If the students were not able to get the glasses then a live stream video was set up inside the gym for all to watch.